Chum Salmon Fly Fishing on Hood Canal Estruary

 Posted by on November 4, 2014 at 12:24 pm  Outdoors  No Responses »
Nov 042014
 
Hood Canal chum salmon fly fishing

Hood Canal chum salmon fly fishing

 

The deluge of rain in the past couple of weeks has swollen rivers that are now overflowing into Puget Sound. As if on cue, chum salmon, having amassed in huge numbers in the waters of the Hood Canal, are now running up rivers and creeks to spawn and die. The annual chum run is one of the hallmark events for Northwest fly fishermen. Chums (or dog salmon) are a favorite sport fish because they readily take a fly and are full of fight once hooked.

In the past few days, my friends and I have been getting our chum “fix” casting to pods of feisty fish as they aggregate in estuaries along the Hood Canal. These aggressive fish don’t hesitate to take your line to the backing and are a challenge to land. Each time I come back from a chum fishing trip, I am so grateful to live in such an amazing area.

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Jul 162014
 

While I was walking along an estuary in the Hood Canal the other day, I was startled by a cry in a small water channel at low tide. It was a newborn harbor seal pup swimming unattended. It appeared to be only a few days old since the pink umbilical cord was still hanging down from the pup’s belly. There was no sign of the mom or other seals nearby. The pup was as curious about me as I was about him.

 

 

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Sep 112013
 
Trident Nuclear Submarine Crossing the Hood Canal Bridge

Trident Nuclear Submarine Crossing the Hood Canal Bridge

Over the summer, on the way to the shellfish grounds at Dosewallips State Park, we ran into an unusual traffic backup just before crossing the Hood Canal Bridge. The line of cars was not moving so we got out of the car and walked to the bridge to see what the holdup was.

The presence of several state trooper cruisers blocking the entrance to the bridge made us really curious. A section of the bridge section was being retracted for a boat crossing but it was no ordinary boat.

Trident Nuclear Submarine Guarded by Two Ships

Trident Nuclear Submarine Guarded by Two Ships

A Trident nuclear submarine from Naval Base Kitsap was crossing the bridge on its way out to sea. The submarine was guarded by two large ships alongside of it as well as by US Coast Guard boats. I have been delayed by sub crossings at the Hood Canal Bridge before but this was the first time that I was close enough to actually see a submarine cross the bridge.

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