Flyfishing for Largemouth Bass on Small Lakes

 Posted by on October 7, 2014 at 11:20 pm  Outdoors  No Responses »
Oct 072014
 
Largemouth bass fishing

Largemouth bass fishing

 
It was much too warm and sunny yesterday to stay inside so I took the opportunity to explore a small lake near Carnation, WA. I had read that this lake had a decent population of native trout and was anxious to check it out with my float tube and 5 wt fly rod.

Largemouth bass on a green frog fly

Largemouth bass on a green frog fly

When I scanned the new lake, there was no surface activity whatsoever so I was a little worried.  I first hugged the shoreline casting my woolly bugger into the banks and weeds. I didn’t get any strikes for the first 10 minutes so I was thinking the trip would be a big bust. But, as soon as I reached an area full of lily pads, the woolly bugger was suddenly devoured by a fish. After a good fight, I was surprised that a good size largemouth bass was attached to my fly! After that, I caught one bass after another. I switched to surface flies and the great action continued. The bass took a variety of dry flies especially grasshoppers, but my favorite “fly” had to be a green frog imitation. When I opened the bass’ mouth, it was obvious they could even swallow a frog much larger than my fly.

Bass are not typical targets for Northwest flyfishermen, but I’ve become a big fan of bass fishing. Catching them on surface flies is a special treat.

 

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Rattlesnake Lake Walk Near North Bend

 Posted by on April 4, 2012 at 6:03 am  Family, Outdoors  No Responses »
Apr 042012
 
Rattlesnake Lake with Rattlesnake Ledge in background

Rattlesnake Lake with Rattlesnake Ledge in background

If you are looking for a nice easy walk on a peaceful lake close to Seattle, I highly recommend Rattlesnake Lake near North Bend.

There are several short trails along the east side of the lake that are great for walking your dog or a quick picnic stop. On my walk there a few days ago, I only saw one other party walking around the east side of the lake. When I first saw the lake years ago, I was quite taken aback by the deep turquoise-colored water and the jutting tree stumps especially along the northern shore of the lake. Amazing to see such natural beauty just a half hour from Seattle. The old growth tree stumps and old foundations from Cedar Falls can be seen when the lake is  low.

You can also catch the start (or end depending on your direction) of the Iron Horse Trail (the John Wayne Pioneer Trail) at the lake.

The trail to Rattlesnake Ledge, the prominent rock outcropping overseeing the Lake, is two miles to the top with an elevation gain of 1,160 feet. If you hike up Rattlesnake Ledge, be careful as a hiker had a fatal fall a couple of weeks ago. Make sure your kids are close by on this hike.

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